ABC Block Club

Every month on my Facebook group,

“Sew Anyways with Nancy McNally”

We offer 2 new blocks. Yes, a new quilt block. No, I do not design the block. The blocks come from this book “501 Rotary Cut Quilt Blocks”.

Over a year ago, Cheri and I sat down with book in hand, went through each page of blocks to find different blocks, quilt blocks that are not normally seen in today’s quilts.

Cheri loves researching the history of each block. The information she discovers is always interesting. In Cheri’s write up, she does her best to find the origination of the block and how the block was published. Along with the history, she offers a variety of colorways you might want to create the block in yourself. Here is an example of Cheri’s latest write up for the block Ladies Wreath:

“Ladies’ Wreath
“On or under your hair? “
Ladies Art Company was established in 1889. Ladies Art Co. was the first business to offer hundreds of quilt patterns in a mail order catalog. The last recorded publishing from this company was in 1974. Ladies Art Company’s historical importance in the quilt world needs to be publicized. It had enormous influence on America’s system of naming quilt blocks in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Ladies’ Wreath was originally published in 1897 by the ladies Art Company, pattern #322.

I kept searching. What was a Ladies Wreath? Why name a quilt block after it? I was assuming to find a reference to a hair decoration placed on the head. What I found was actually a book for females. It was a collection of literature, industry, religion and beautiful graphics all written by English and American female writers. It was published approximately from 1837-1870. Below is a link if you would like to look inside one of these books. These books would help educate females of things outside their own communities. What a resource these books must have been. This would have been a good reason to create a block in my option.”

And here is my block. I used Northcott’s Stonehenge 10″ square precut bundle, and a batik. I pulled 3 squares out of the bundle and cut what was needed. I wanted variety of shades.

Ladies Wreath block

What did we learn in this block?

Working with half square triangles.

Working with half square triangles can be a little bit of an issue. I have adopted the method of cutting my fabrics slightly larger for my first cuts. Construct the block as directed and trim the half square triangles to the correct size before pulling the block’s components together.

Tip:

To help this block lay flat, it would be best to press the seams open.

Why? In the areas where 3 half square triangles come together there is a lot of fabric. The seams make it very bulky and sometimes your needle will NOT want to go through that bulk and or the feeddogs on your machine can’t pull all of the bulk through. Sew…if you press your seams open, this creates less bulk in those areas. See picture below, the areas marked with a red circle are “bulky seams”. There are 12 layers of fabric coming together if the seams were not pressed open. There are 2 other areas in the block that could benefit from having the seams pressed open. Can you find them?

Time to get moving on with my day. Next ABC Block is: Lady of the Lake. I modified it….made one, but don’t care for my color choices. I plan on making another one. I will include the modification in my next blog ABC block post.

Happy Quilting!

Nancy McNally

ABC Block Club: Domino Net

Man oh man has it been a while since I have written a blog. Life has been overwhelming and I needed to take a step back to get caught up. All is good now and I am feeling more inspired to create as each day arrives. On my Facebook group page we are learning 2 new blocks a month. They are being presented by their name in alphabetic order: ABC Block Club

Facebook Group page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/240137286367256/

Today’s Block: Domino Net

Rich Fall Colors for my Domino Net Block

Domino Net was a very easy block to create. Went together quickly. I can see this block using only 2 colors to create a great visual chain running in your quilt.

My friend, Cheri, has been offering our FB group history on the blocks. She has been doing a great job at researching the blocks. It is interesting to read about the origins of the block(s) and the designer. The why’s are sometimes found to let us know why the block was designed, sometimes there is no history for the block. Cheri digs and digs trying to find out as much information as she can. Keep up the good work Cheri!!

How about you? Would you make this block? Nothing difficult, precuts are great for this project.

Enjoy!

Happy Quilting!

Nancy McNally

 

Acrobats: Quarter Square Triangles

Several years back I was introduced to a fantastic book: 501 Rotary Cut Quilt Blocks by Judy Hopkins.  I have found this book to be a fantastic resource. I use this book often. How do I use it? I have challenged my private Facebook group: Sew Anyways with Nancy McNally to learn 2 new blocks a month. We are currently in our 1st month, block 2: Acrobats.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/240137286367256/

In order to join my group, you have to answer the questions when you request to join. I will approve your membership as soon as I see your request. Now, back to the quarter square block.

The Acrobats block is made up of  9 quarter square triangle units and 11 squares. The layout of the QST. + the Sq. makes the block appear as if there is an X  running through it. This is a block that is not seen very often in the public domain of the World of Quilting. That is the reason I chose Acrobats for the 2nd block of this month.

Let’s talk about Quarter Square Triangle (QST).

It consists of 4 triangles (hence the name quarter).

A QST consists of 4 triangles sewn together to create a square. You can’t just sew any type/group of triangles to create a QST. The triangles must have the cross or straight of grain as their base or bottom. The 2 remaining sides of the triangle come together to form a 90° angle (the center)…but don’t put this one the outside…its cut from the bias! That means it will stretch or distort.

In order to figure out what size of a QST you need, there is some math you need to do…I know I know…just bare with me.

Let’s say we want a 3″ FINISHED size QST block/unit : add 1.25 to your 3″

We want our QST to have 2 different fabrics.

3″ + 1.25 = 4.25

We will need 2 fabrics cut at 4.25″ (4 1/4″) squares.

Cut on BOTH diagonals.

Place fabrics in the layout you would like and sew.

The QST will measure 3 1/2″ x 3 1/2″ this is the unfinished size

It will finish at 3″ x 3″. In the diagram below. I have 2 squares lined up (1 black & 1 white). Blue lines going through both blocks showing to cut on both diagonals. You will yield 4 triangles of each. I only show 2 of each, because that is all you need for 1 quarter square triangle block/unit. You will yield 2 quarter square triangle blocks/units total. The 3rd picture in the diagram shows which ones to sew together. Press towards the darker color. Pressing lines/arrows are not shown in the picture.

Sew…that is how you do the math for a Quarter Square Triangle! It is really simple!

The only step remaining once you piece your quarter square triangle block is to trim to the correct size. Sometimes sewing triangles can be tricky, they can slide or move. Once your block is pieced, iron, then trim to the correct size. For Trimming, I always find center. Align my ruler on the center. See the diagram below.

My block is 3″, center is 1.5. I rest the 1.5 intersection on my ruler on the very center of my block. I have it circled in red. Before trimming, check all 4 sides of the ruler/block. Make SURE the fabric is extending past the desired measurement, not less than or on the inside of the desired amount. If my fabric would have been on the other side (less than) of the 3″ mark…going towards the 2″ side, I would not trim. At that point, I would begin examining my seam allowance…

As for the Acrobat Block,

Happy Quilting!

Nancy McNally